VIDEONALE-KFW PRIZE 2011: Nate Harrison

Nate Harrison is the winner of the VIDEONALE Prize KfW 2011. The five-person jury selected from among 48 nominated video works one by this American artist entitled “Aura Dies Hard (Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Copy)”. The topic of this video is exactly this: the art of video. In his work the artist is questioning the traditional perception of the video medium as an immaterial art form.

 

The members of the jury were: Julia Apitzsch – Advisor of the German National Scholarship/Academic Foundation, Julia Draganovic – Curator, Bologna, Mischa Kuball – Artist and Professor at the Academy of Media Arts, Cologne, François Michaud – Curator of the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris and Christoph Schreier – Deputy Director of the Kunstmuseum Bonn.

 

For the forth time the KfW Bankengruppe serves as the main sponsor of the Videonale Bonn. “The KfW is particularly glad to promote, in the Videonale, an event with a high international reputation, which stands for innovation, creativity, and thus also for a changing stance towards the media,” stated Dr. Günther Bräunig, Member of the Board of Directors of the KfW Bankengruppe. “At our bank locations we concentrate on projects with social aim, which assume responsibility and are closely connected with the Sponsoring Society of the KfW.”

 

The jury decided unanimously to award the Videonale-KfW prize to Nate Harrison and his video “Aura Dies Hard (Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Copy).” Harrison’s media reflexive work consists of a structural compilation of bootlegged historical pieces of the old masters of video art and presents itself as meta text on the current media debate. Questions on exhibition presentation, limited editions and distribution as well as the debate about copyright and copy left take center stage of Harrison’s reflection about the history of video art from a museum’s point of view. Harrison does not omit uncomfortable themes like the aging of the medium and related problems or curatorial practices and responsibilities often neglected by art experts. The history of video art from its beginnings as documentation of time based art to the development of an independent art genre, the change of view on video that was for a long time understood as “immaterial” and now, due to the fast development of always new technologies, represents one of the strongest challenges for restorers, the role of curators, gallerists, collectors, friends and colleagues of artist regarding the production and distribution of non-authorized copies and therefore the creation of a history of reproduced art works that  gain total  independency from the author and become originals in their own way – Harrison stages all this in a fresh, personal and self –deprecating way.

 

The jury further awarded honorary mention to Johanna Reich with her video performance „black hole“, Gonzalo H. Rodriguez  with „Rebeca“ and Helena Öhman Mc Cardle with „I remember.”

 

Aura Dies Hard (Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Copy)

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